Monday, May 25, 2020

The Effects Of Technology On The Obesity - 844 Words

Technology is always a useful innovation for us, especially the new technology since it brings to us the easiest and the quickest way to the information around us in all its types. However, new technology has also a side effect on us, and one of those side effects is the obesity that causes from the new tech. In the report â€Å"Waistlines of the World† shows the effectiveness of the technology on the obesity in the period 1988-2009 for 27 OECD countries. First of all, the authors’ conclusions, which were created between the ICT investment and the prevalence of the obesity. The first conclusion, which is for each 10 % point increase in ICT investment in the share of the gross capital formation, causes an increase in the obesity. That will increase 1.4% point on average. Or, roughly 4.2 million people in country the size of it like the U.S. My reaction on this one, I found it very surprising that the investment on the ICT increases the obesity rate no matter of what the percentage is. But, talking about the 10 % investment in the ICT will increase 4.2 million people in the obesity in a country its size like the U.S is very frustrating. Thus, that kind of investment should be first studied and controlled by the government in order to avoid the obesity that causes from those kind of investment. Secondly, countries with high ICT investment rates will have the highest rates among OECD countries. However, the 1% percentage point incr ease in the physical active can prevent a 0.2%Show MoreRelatedThe Effects Of Technology On Childhood Obesity983 Words   |  4 PagesThe effects technology has on childhood obesity Twenty five percent of children in the US are overweight and a shocking eleven percent of them are obese (Dehghan, Akhtar-Danesh and Merchant). Child hood obesity is a forerunner to one of the United States greatest public health crisis. The growth of technology has had a major impact on childhood obesity. Obesity is a widespread epidemic and is getting incredibly worse as technology increases. The use of technology relates directly with childhoodRead MoreTechnology Is Making The Citizens Of The World1336 Words   |  6 PagesObesity has dramatically increased due to the progression of technology in the form of currency, entertainment, and the prosperity of our country causing humans to gain weight. As one goes through his or her life they constantly see people with their faces lodged into the screen of the technology they are using. They seem to be lost and oblivious to the outside world. The technology created seems to have a positive effect upon the lives of people around the wo rld, however these false visions overlookRead MoreObesity : American Culture : Obesity997 Words   |  4 PagesMark Loftus Prof. Downie ENG 102 21 February 2016 Obesity in American Culture Obesity plays an undeniable role in today s culture. Many factors such as increased meal size, food being advertised more often, lack of physical activity required for jobs, technology becoming a necessity in everyday life hindering activity, and unhealthy food being available at almost every corner of the streets. Ethnic backgrounds also play a role in obesity. Growing up I dealt with being overweight and had toRead MoreCause And Effect Of Obesity1477 Words   |  6 Pagesand effect essay Ahmad Elham ENG 111/FH21 Sunithi Gnanadoss May 2, 2017 After World War II, when the baby Boomer generation emerged, USA economy increased and people started utilizing fast food without a diet plan, without caring about nutrition in their food and the calories they were consuming caused obesity. At the same time, transportation and technology revolutions which meant to bring ease in nation’s lives, brought laziness and obesity. Ultimately, many others call obesity a geneticRead MoreEffects Of Overuse Of Technology On Human Health1253 Words   |  6 PagesEffects of overuse of Technology on Human Health Technology has become a major part of human activities today. People engage in different activities through the use of technology for communication, traveling, and different devices used in every career. Despite the fact that technology has eased the performance of different tasks, it has a detrimental effect on human health. It has an effect on people across all ages and results in health effects such as depression, obesity, brain tumors, musculoskeletalRead MoreObesity Is The Main Problem All Over The World1504 Words   |  7 Pages In this modern era, Obesity is the main problem all over the world. Obesity is cause of increasing so many diseases in all stages of human life. Some types of foods and the Environment is also responsible for that. In this technological world, human replaces with machines which makes adversely effect on human health. People mostly depend on technologies and becoming lazy. Some people think that obesity is major health problem these days due to plenty o f reasons. One the other hand, most of the peopleRead MoreResults of Advancements in Technology Essay811 Words   |  4 Pagessociety, modern technology is evidently developing rapidly and it is portrayed as a negative impact. It can be seen that technology is a substitution of all characteristics of life. The purpose of every technological invention is to benefit the lives of mankind; thus re-enforcing the positive connotation of technology. However, in long term it may not be beneficial; such as, education, work and leisure are all becoming dependent on technology; cyberspace is dangerous and child obesity is increasingRead MoreThe Effects Of Technology On Younger Children1319 Words   |  6 Pages Health Effects from the Use of Technology in Younger Children The modern times we live in today are constantly changing in hopes that we as humans thrive successfully. To be more specific, technological advancements are driving our society into new feats that could never be imagined in the past. Thanks to this technology, we have excelled in vital fields such as medicine, education, engineering, and many more aspects that can be considered vital for our benefit, let alone our existence. ModernRead MoreHuman Related Obesity1090 Words   |  4 PagesIs obesity a disease or a human related cause? Researchers have studied this question for years and have come to a variety of different conclusions. Some believe that obesity is a disease and can only be prevented by medications, while others believe that obesity is a human related cause and can be only prevented by a healthy diet and exercise. The American Medical Association (AMA) recently announced that obesity is officially a disease. Dr. Patrice Harris, a member of the American Medical Associati onRead MoreObesity Is A Common Problem1222 Words   |  5 PagesThroughout the world, obesity is a common problem. This is especially true for the United States. About 22 million children were obese at the age of five in 2007 (Stern and Kazaks 1), and this trend keeps growing every year. Effects of obesity control quality of life from something as simple as ease of mobility to as serious as mental health issues regarding low self-esteem. The negative impact of obesity influences daily life from breaking down traditional family meals, the amount of physical activity

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Theme Of Racism In Heart Of Darkness - 782 Words

Depicting actual events and scenarios in a fictional setting can shed a new light on certain topics, but when the real and fictional meet problems can sometimes arise. In Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, the theme of race and white or national superiority is prevalent in the text, but it leaves the reader wondering if the text is truly racist or not. There are two sides to this argument, but for the most part the story is not racist. On the side on racism, the signs can be seen relatively early on in the work as show when Marlow is retelling about the death of Fresleven at the hands of the village chief’s son. Before Fresleven’s ruthless attack was described, the reader is given a description of him that is supposed to draw in sympathy†¦show more content†¦The reader also gets views and reactions of Marlow that shows that he’s has a better moral compass than the rest, as he is uneased by his aunt’s words, offers a dying native laborer a b iscuit, and being able to work with the so called â€Å"cannibals† to make it further along the river. Marlow is the saving grace in this story and helps it from being deemed entirely spiteful or even racist. When comparing other characters for example Kurtz to Marlow, he appears to be the most sensible or morally sound character. Both of these characters can be seen as two sides of the white Europeans. Kurtz demonstrates the superiority and more aggressive side as he initiates the conflict between the natives, uses the natives to his own advantage and for his own purposes, for example cheating on his fiancà © with a native, and having his last words or final request being â€Å"exterminate all the brutes!† (1990). Whereas Marlow demonstrates the more rational side who is fine with working with the Africans and using heir help to reach their goal, feels general unease on how people comment on the extermination of the â€Å"ignorant†, and he even laments the Afr ican helmsman’s death. That is one thing that Heart of Darkness was able to accomplish and that was showing both sides of the conflict and inflect upon them in a critical manner. Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness was considered by Chinua Achebe as being racist but that really is not the case. If anything, Heart of Darkness isShow MoreRelatedTheme Of Racism In Joseph Conrads Heart Of Darkness1008 Words   |  5 Pages6.13.17 Racism is misleading: Theme of TFA Racism is still a problem today, even though it has changed over time. In the past, it was more open and something that was normal. Now, there are less people who are racist, or, those who are racist have just gotten better at hiding their thoughts and changing their words so that they seem like normal comments. In Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, the main character, Marlow, journeys the Congo and describes what he sees. In a response to Heart of DarknessRead MoreComparing Shakespeares Othello with Conrads Heart of Darkness738 Words   |  3 PagesOthello with Conrad’s Heart of Darkness It is often that when we read great works of literature we come across similar themes. Authors use powerful ideas that they believe will move their readers and relate to them so they become engaged in the words written. William Shakespeare and Joseph Conrad were amazing writers of their times and even though their works were written almost 300 years apart, both, Othello and Heart of Darkness, have coinciding themes. The major theme that both ShakespeareRead MoreThe Heart Of Darkness By Joseph Conrad1166 Words   |  5 PagesUse of Darkness in Heart of Darkness Everyone claims to be equal, and nowadays people are working hard to create equality regardless gender and race. Meanwhile, race and ethnicity become one of the most popular topics of modern literature. The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad depicts a story of colonization took place in the Belgian Congo through Marlow’s perspective. In this book, the author portrays the European ideas of civilizing Africa as well as the ideas of imperialism and racism. AlthoughRead MoreRacism And Sexism In Joseph Conrads Heart Of Darkness1108 Words   |  5 Pagesundertaking VCE. From the time Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad was published in 1899 the novel has been held under considerable scrutiny as many interpretations have been developed over the novels true intent as well as the overall message portrayed within. Chinua Achebe’s â€Å"An Image of Africa† is a well-known criticism on Heart of Darkness that focuses on a Post-Colonial perspective to describe the nature of the novel. Jeremy Hawthorn’s â€Å"The Women of Heart of Darkness† is another well-known criticismRead MoreThe Heart Of The Congo852 Words   |  4 PagesSet in the heart of the Congo, Heart of Darkness is a tale of a man named Marlow who is hired as a steamboat captain by a Belgian owned company. During the late 19th century, Africa was divvied up, so to speak, by imperialistic powers and was the world’s hotspot for the much sought after i vory. Marlow was hired for a quest to set out and find a mystery man named Kurtz who was also part of the same company and was currently in the Congo. Kurtz had apparently gone crazy, so it was the mission ofRead MoreShakespeare s Heart Of Darkness1424 Words   |  6 Pages Relevance of Heart of Darkness Alexander Spirovski LITR 211 Professor David Auchter â€Æ' Joseph Conrad s Heart of Darkness contains both relevant and irrelevant elements to today s society. Issues present in the text such as imperialism, racism, and moral ambiguity are still present today but their formats have changed enough in society that Heart of Darkness approaches obsolescence in perspective. Concurrently, the characters and theme presented in Heart of Darkness are scarce in fictionalRead MoreAnnotated Bibliography Of The Heart Of Darkness1207 Words   |  5 PagesNoel Guillen Mr.Nigro English 8/12/17 The Heart of Darkness and the Secret Sharer Annotated Bibliography Zeitler, Michael. â€Å"Isolation in Heart of Darkness.† Encyclopedia of Themes in Literature, 3-Volume Set, Facts on File, 2010. Blooms Literature, online.infobase.com/HRC/Search/Details/38721?q=heart of darkness. Accessed 30 Nov. 2017. Early in the narration of the heart of the darkness, it starts as Marlow the fellow sailor traveler that has an adventuress mindset but he is a very quiet andRead MoreEssay on Another Heart of Darkness1021 Words   |  5 Pages Ignorance and Racism Joseph Conrad develops themes of personal power, individual responsibility, and social justice in his book Heart of Darkness. His book has all the trappings of the conventional adventure tale - mystery, exotic setting, escape, suspense, unexpected attack. Chinua Achebe concluded, quot;Conrad, on the other hand, is undoubtedly one of the great stylists of modern fiction and a good story-teller into the bargainquot; (Achebe 252). Yet, despite Conrads great story telling, heRead More Theme of Colonialism and Imperialism in Conrads Heart of Darkness1008 Words   |  5 PagesThe Theme of Imperialism in Heart of Darkness       Of the themes in Conrads Heart of Darkness, imperialism and colonialism are probably the most important. While Heart of Darkness is actually set on the Thames River, the events Marlow describes are set on the Congo River. The Congo is the river that brought about the partition of Africa that occurred from 1880 to 1890 (McLynn 13). This event marked the beginning of the colonization of Africa. In 1884, European nations held a conference andRead MoreAnalysis Of Conrad s The Heart Of Darkness 1612 Words   |  7 PagesThe 9th plague was Darkness. A darkness so thick, people could not see for three days. Darkness restricts vision and thus the way man understands the world. Conrad explores a similar darkness throughout The Heart of Darkness. He writes about how this darkness, a blindness towards others, can lead to the moral degradation of mankind in his novel. Throughout the novel, the reader is able to see Conrad’s perspective of humanity by discussing two integral issues of the time, Racism and Colonialism. More

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Vietnam War and American Culture - 1684 Words

Vietnam Wars Impact on American Culture Donna Whittle DeVry University Introduction to Humanities I. Introduction and Thesis Statement In the 1960’s America went through many cultural changes. Martin Luther King Jr., a civil rights activist, delivered his famous, â€Å"I have a dream† speech. African Americans were fighting for peace, freedom and equality. The United States was involved in the Vietnam War, committed to anti-communism. African Americans were deployed to Vietnam. The Vietnam War and Civil Rights Movement coincided. African Americans believed fighting for democracy abroad would help gain civil rights at home. II. Events that Led to the Advancement January 20, 1961, John F. Kennedy†¦show more content†¦Young people known as â€Å"hippies† started protesting through long hair, music, sex and drugs. During the movement the famous Woodstock Music Festival emerged. During Woodstock it was believed personal rebellion reigned over political rebellion. Open sex and drugs swept America. Gallagher, B. (May, 2013). The Vietnam War and the Civil Rights Movement. Retrieved from http://www.americansc.org.uk/online/vietnam_civil_rights.htm This article discusses President Lyndon B. Johnson’s involvement with Vietnam and civil rights. Vietnam and Civil Rights Movement protests coincided. African Americans were discriminated against at home and in the United States armed forces. In previous history blacks fought segregated in war. During Vietnam blacks were intergraded with a small number of segregated troops. Blacks fought for democracy believing they would return home with equal rights. Blacks felt they had earned the right to be equal. After returning home from Vietnam, blacks remained discriminated against. The war heightened awareness of discrimination. Martin Luther King Jr., with blacks and whites, marched to Washington to protest for equal rights. Kings speech was one of the most powerful protests in history. His speech for freedom was televised across America. King was assassinated and white soldiers applauded his death. The military began posting confederate flags on equipment. Racism was tolerated in military bases. Legislation passed the Civil Rights Act in 1964.Show MoreRelatedAmerican Culture : The Vietnam War2157 Words   |  9 Pages1102 February 22, 2015 The Vietnam War On February 28th 1991 after the speedy 100-hour ground war against Iraqi troops, George W Bush proclaimed proudly: â€Å"By God, we’ve kicked the Vietnam Syndrome once and for all† The fall of Saigon had not marked the end of the Vietnam as Bush accurately conceded to the people, the repercussions of the war can still be seen today in American culture, it has sustained through the Vietnam veterans, as the basis for the support of anti-war precedencies, and morphedRead MoreImpact of Vietnam War on American Culture1421 Words   |  6 PagesThe Vietnam War began in the year 1954, after the ascension to power of Ho Chi Minh, who was a communist leader in North Vietnam. The leader was spreading communism, and because the United States wanted to stop the spread, it sent military troops to aid South Vietnamese to stop this vice. The war saw about 3million people die with the inclusion of 58,000 American soldiers. About 150,000 people were wounded during the war. In 1975, Sout h Vietnamese government surrendered the war after the communistRead MoreImpact Of Vietnam War On American Culture1812 Words   |  8 Pages Impact of Vietnam War on American Culture The Vietnam War began in 1954 when Ho Chi Minh and his communist Viet Minh party came into power in North Vietnam. The Vietnam Conflict was one of the most costly and long conflict which was basically between the communist regime of North Vietnam its southern supporter and South Vietnam and its main supporter United States. There were more than 3 million people that were killed in this war, 58, 000 were the American Soldiers and Vietnamese civiliansRead MoreU.s. Vietnam War On American Culture, Politics, And Foreign Policy1060 Words   |  5 Pageshistory, the Vietnam War has left a deep and lasting impact on American culture, politics, and foreign policy. From 1964 to the present day, the Vietnam War redefined the scope of U.S. influence both at home and abroad, and caused a fundamental shift in American society that dramatically changed the way in which Americans viewed their government and the role of the United States as a world power. For an entire generation of Americans, who watched as the horrors of the war in Vietnam unfold beforeRead MoreBook Review of Backfire: a History of How American Culture Led Us Into Vietnam and Made Us Fight the Way We Did764 Words   |  4 PagesBackfire: A History of How American Culture Led Us into Vietnam and Made Us Fight the Way We Did, a book by Loren Baritz, describes the myths America takes into wars, the decisions that made the Vietnam War and the bureaucracy at war. Loren Baritz writes this book about the time period of 1945 to about 1975, which is post World War II to post Vietnam War. Loren Baritz describes how American culture influenced the way the American soldiers fought in Vietnam and how American culture influenced the way politicsRead MoreDiscrimination against Vietnamese Immigrants in America1554 Words   |  7 PagesStates, the Vietnam War sparked the immigration of Vietnamese to America. Vietnamese did not virtually exist in the United States until 1975 when the war forced Vietnamese to evacuate (Pov ell). The war began after Vietminh defeated France and split into North and South Vietnam (O’Connel). In 1956 communist Ho Chi Minh ruled the North Vietnam, and Bao Dai ruled the South, who the United States supported and backed up (O’Connel). The Vietnam War consisted of the North and South Vietnam, fighting againstRead MoreThe Vietnam War : We Can Not Understand War Without Understanding Culture1267 Words   |  6 PagesThe Vietnam War â€Å"We cannot understand war without understanding culture† â€Å"Involvement in two world wars and the Cold War transformed America into a â€Å"crusader state† convinced of the superiority of its institutions and way of life and intent on imposing them on the outside world. † Whether fought at home or abroad every war is to impact all parties involved. Such example of staggering influence on one country’s culture is no more evident then in America’s involvement in the Vietnam War. Upon enteringRead MoreApush Vietnam War886 Words   |  4 PagesOne foreign affair was known as Vietnam. The Vietnam War was the longest war in the nation’s history. This war, from both abroad and at home, drastically changed the society of America, socially, economically, and politically. It caused for much anti-war sentiment and fueled the counter culture movement, it caused inflation and contributed to the stagflation, and brought down Johnson’s reputation and caused for several changes in legislation. While the Vietnam War raged on, other movements roseRead More Bao Ninhs Sorrow of War Essay1010 Words   |  5 PagesBao Ninhs Sorrow of War When we think of the Vietnam War, we think of all the hell and torture that American soldiers went through with little regard to the Vietnamese and the hardships they endured. Reading the Sorrow of War gave me a clear understanding of the Vietnamese people and the suffering that the war caused them. The Sorrow of War is unique and powerful in the sense that it is written by a Vietnam army veteran and gives the perspective of the war from a Vietnamese soldier. It is oneRead MoreAnalysis Of The Movie Miss Saigon Essay1310 Words   |  6 Pages17 year old war orphaned prostitute, Kim and a US GI Soldier, Chris who are torn apart during the fall of Saigon. Set in the Vietnam War these characters are constantly challenged while the city explodes with conflicting cultures matched with the horrors of war and the ever changing effects of the power of love. Chris meets Kim in the nightclub where she works and from that moment to two fall in love but however regardless of the fact that Chri s helps to get a Kim a visa out of Vietnam when the US

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Migration Law Regional Sponsored Migration

Question: Describe about the Migration Law for Regional Sponsored Migration. Answer: Number of options in permanent visas is available for the persons who want to become permanent resident of Australia. It is necessary that applicant meet the requirements of Migration Act of Australia. These visas are also available for the citizens of New Zealand[1]. 1: Dale Jones can apply for Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme Visa (Subclass 187). Visa subclass 187 is for those who want to live and work in regional Australia, and who get nomination from employer. This visa allows a person to live permanent in Australia. This visa provide process in two steps, first applicant must get nomination from the approved employer and second make application under nominated stream. Applicant can apply from the Australia under this visa and applicant must hold appropriate visa defined under these three categories. This visa has three streams: 1 Temporary Resident Transmission Stream-this stream is available for the applicants who hold visa 457. Requirements to apply under this scheme: Applicant must hold visa under Temporary Work (Skilled) visa (subclass 457). Employer must nominate applicant for his skill. Direct Entry Stream- applicant must be nominated by their employer under the direct entry scheme. Applicant must hold visa under Temporary Work (Skilled) visa (subclass 457). Employer must nominate applicant for his skill. If applicant hold Special Category visa (subclass 444) or a New Zealand Citizen Family Relationship visa (subclass 461) then he did not need to pass skill assessment test. Agreement Stream- this stream is available for the applicants who hold visa 457, and must be nominated by their employer under labor agreement. In this case Dale Jones can apply under direct stream of visa 187[2]. 2: Applicant must have to submit expression of interest if he have no employer who can nominate him. After submitting expression of interest state or territory government can nominate him. Applicant needs a valid passport for this visa. Following are the requirements for applying under visa subclass 187: Applicant must be nominated by the approved employer in regional Australia. Applicant must be under the age of 50 years at the time of making application. Applicant must possess required skill and qualification for the occupation under which he nominated. Applicant must hold required registration, membership, license of nominated occupation. Applicant must have necessary language English skills at the time of making application for TRT DE stream. Applicant must meet necessary health and character test. Applicant must meet the requirement of the stream in which he apply[3]. References: [1] Australian government: department of immigration and border protection, Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme visa (subclass 187) https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/187-. Australian government: department of immigration and border protection, Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme Visa (Subclass 187) Employer Document Checklist, https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/187-/Regional-Sponsored-Migration-Scheme-visa-(subclass-187)-employer-document-checklist. Australian government: department of immigration and border protection, New Zealand Citizens Do I need a visa to enter Australia, https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Life/New-. [1] Australian government: department of immigration and border protection, New Zealand Citizens Do I need a visa to enter Australia, https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Life/New-. [2] Australian government: department of immigration and border protection. Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme visa (subclass 187) https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/187-. [3] Australian government: department of immigration and border protection, Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme Visa (Subclass 187) Employer Document Checklist, https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/187-/Regional-Sponsored-Migration-Scheme-visa-(subclass-187)-employer-document-checklist.

Friday, April 10, 2020

Population in Mexico City free essay sample

Effects of over population in Mexico City There are parts of the world that have an alarming overpopulation rate, one of these locations is Mexico city which is located in the Federal District, Capital of the Country of Mexico. Mexico Citys enormous population continues to rapidly increase every day. With approximately 20 million residents; up from 9 million only 20 years ago, Mexico City is considered the most populous urban center on earth. There are many people in the country of Mexico who move to Mexico city because they feel that there are better life and employment pportunities there, however there are also hundreds of people that are born there every year and these factors contribute even more to its overcrowding and overpopulation. Mexico City has a poor living habitat because it is located in the Valley of Mexico, which is highly vulnerable to volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. These natural disasters have caused much destruction making these grounds to be weak and dry, nev er the less the city is rapidly diminishing water supply which adds a danger problem to the overcrowding of it’s population. We will write a custom essay sample on Population in Mexico City or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Once its water supply is gone, the only way to receive water will be to transport it from across the mountains. Not only does the city have to pipe water in, but it also has to pipe the sewage out of waste-filled areas. This would be a very expensive undertaking and could cost Mexico City a large amount of money. In addition Mexico City contains a extremely high rate of bad air pollution which is one of the most dangerous problem and health hazard presently facing the city. The air in the city is so polluted that at times the air quality exceeds 100 times the cceptable level. There are currently thousands of factories and millions of vehicles are the main causes of the air pollution in Mexico City. Mexico City has many problems at the present time, and it does not look as if it is going to get much better in the future. Important negatives caused by such over population in Mexico city is the decreased amount of space people have. The less space people have to live in, the harder it i s for them to get along. People find themselves competing for space as well as food, water and air! This makes people’s behavior more hostile in their environment. Mexico city has a high crime rate and these city civilians are stereotyped as being people with a high lack of respect for others. Since personal space is reduced, violence is more prevalent in the most highly populated areas. This behavior is probably due to aggression and anxiety brought on by a lack of personal space. Overpopulation also leads to poverty, disease and famine as people desperately compete for jobs, food and shelter. As the earths population continues to grow, it will be harder to feed people. Furthermore, Mexico as a whole country contains a majority of catholic religious believers which means that there is very little use of birth control. This causes for couples to have large number of children which only adds to the overpopulation dilemma in this city. Consequently overcrowding also adds to the rate of poverty which essentially contributes to a lack of education. Global warming seems to be linked to pollution of the air, and the seas are being polluted by oil spills and waste dumping. Fewer people would mean less pollution from cars, factories, planes and trains. Mankind has a responsibility to the planet, our own species and to other life forms to limit reproduction. Much more emphasis needs to be placed on planning family size. More education needs to be made available about the consequences of unchecked population growth. Free birth control and family counseling ought to be made available to everyone in Mexico not just Mexico city. The Mexican Government should take an active role in alleviating the population crisis. As a monetary incentive to remain childless, tax rebates should be given to people who dont have children. The population bomb threatening the earth can still be defused. If the population problem were addressed, the rest of the worlds woes would be much easier to remedy. Overpopulation underlies most problems facing many places all over the world, and one of them being greatly affected is Mexico city today. People can all help by limiting their own family size and encouraging young people to do the same and voting for laws to encourage zero population growth. A brighter future will be their reward.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Wake in Fright

â€Å"Wake in fright† first appealed to me through its title rather than its promised content. At first I found the novel very tedious to read and lacking in the action that was promised by the title but as I continued through the text I became engrossed in this violent story of animal people and animal customs set in the overpowering heat of the Australian outback. The language, I found was not difficult to comprehend and was simplistic and basic. I feel that if the language were any more complicated than this it would have taken the focus off the storyline, which is at times a labour to fully comprehend. Although as the storyline became more erratic I sometimes found myself lost in the speech of the text in which the main character thinks to himself which matches in some ways how erratic the character’s life has become. One of the first things I noticed about the text was that there was a very heavy, depressed tone which continued to increase throughout the text as Grant’s stay in Bundanyabba continued and gradually worsened so the tone reflects Grant’s helplessness and his state of mind. In the opening pages Cook presents us with people who â€Å" have withered, their skin contracting and their eyes sinking as their stock became white bones† and statements such as â€Å"little of the hope that he had abandoned†. These underline the oppressive tone which continues throughout the novel. John Grant is a character that I found I could not admire. At the start of the text I didn’t really feel a response towards him but as the story continued I felt immense pity for him and even felt some of his own frustrations as a simple game of chance sets off a chain of events which slowly moves John Grant into a hideous nightmare world. He is confronted by the ugly side of the Australian outback, where human behaviour descends to animal depths. Every effort made by Grant to escape this living hell is frustrated by the cruel hand of fat... Free Essays on Wake in Fright Free Essays on Wake in Fright â€Å"Wake in fright† first appealed to me through its title rather than its promised content. At first I found the novel very tedious to read and lacking in the action that was promised by the title but as I continued through the text I became engrossed in this violent story of animal people and animal customs set in the overpowering heat of the Australian outback. The language, I found was not difficult to comprehend and was simplistic and basic. I feel that if the language were any more complicated than this it would have taken the focus off the storyline, which is at times a labour to fully comprehend. Although as the storyline became more erratic I sometimes found myself lost in the speech of the text in which the main character thinks to himself which matches in some ways how erratic the character’s life has become. One of the first things I noticed about the text was that there was a very heavy, depressed tone which continued to increase throughout the text as Grant’s stay in Bundanyabba continued and gradually worsened so the tone reflects Grant’s helplessness and his state of mind. In the opening pages Cook presents us with people who â€Å" have withered, their skin contracting and their eyes sinking as their stock became white bones† and statements such as â€Å"little of the hope that he had abandoned†. These underline the oppressive tone which continues throughout the novel. John Grant is a character that I found I could not admire. At the start of the text I didn’t really feel a response towards him but as the story continued I felt immense pity for him and even felt some of his own frustrations as a simple game of chance sets off a chain of events which slowly moves John Grant into a hideous nightmare world. He is confronted by the ugly side of the Australian outback, where human behaviour descends to animal depths. Every effort made by Grant to escape this living hell is frustrated by the cruel hand of fat...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Educational Psychology Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words

Educational Psychology - Essay Example However, many critics have proved Piaget to be inaccurate about the time in which the student is developmentally ready to conserve and because children develop individually and not just static some students are able to operate at a higher level than others. Further, some students may need concrete materials to manipulate whereas others may be able to solve the problem abstractly.The author of this paper â€Å"Educational Psychology† believes that selecting the appropriate lesson is important to the success of all students but it is critical to the success of students with disabilities. For example, the teacher with students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (adhd) may adopt a task analysis approach to the teaching of numbers. In this approach the teacher must during preparation time, systematically and sequentially go through the steps involved in the understanding of the value of eleven. The teacher must itemize each step as this procedure would become a recipe fo r understanding the value of eleven. The teacher would begin the lesson by reviewing previously taught lessons to ensure that students remember the previous concepts and are ready to move forward. Also it would focus their minds to the lesson. Once the teacher is satisfied that students have the required previous knowledge and skill, then the teacher may proceed to distribute concrete examples of the numeral ten. The teacher may then allow students to count the objects up to 10. The next step would be to add one more object and elicit from students.